Circle of Influence print, Artmuse.com

Circle of Influence, Sphere of Influence

Digital archival print, size variable, 2010

Available exclusively through artmuse.com

These two images are scans of existing oil paintings for the background, plus scans of some architectural images that are layered together. A combination of different floor plans and elevations of Roman architecture are atop each other on transparencies. These were scanned into one digital image which sits on top of the painterly drips. Sphere of Influence is the elevation view of different buildings, and, Circle of Influence is the plan view of different buildings.

Sphere of Influence painting, Artmuse.com
Sphere of Influence painting, Artmuse.com

 

Signpost

“Art Lives Here” Signposts

Fall 2010 project for –Art Outside– and –EAST–:

Be part of Fisterra’s community. Find a sign and locate it on a map as part of a scavenger hunt at –Art Outside–. Buy a sign and hang it where you live, then go online to add it to the “Art Lives Here” google map.

Here are instructions for adding your signpost to the –ART LIVES HERE MAP–:

  • You must have a Google account to add your placemark to the map, but you can see the map without one.
  • Go to the link and sign in to Google if you are not already signed in. Navigate on the map to the place where you want to add your marker. Zoom in or out if that helps.
  • Click the “Edit” button in the left panel Put your mouse cursor over the exact location you want to put the placemark.
  • Click the RIGHT mouse button and select “Add a placemark” In the pop-up window that appears, enter a Title and Description and click OK.
  • Click the Save button. You’re done.

Tips for the Advanced User:

To use a photo with your placemark, click “Rich text” and then click the picture icon.  You cannot upload a photo, but if you have one somewhere with its own Web address (URL), you can point to it.

To change the look or your placemark, click on the picture of the marker, then pick a marker.  If you are really advanced you can use a marker of your own creation.

 

Radiant, painting

Radiant Series

Artworks hanging at Texas French Bread

 

Ring Trophies

Ring Trophies

Five Ring Trophies are mounted to the third floor catwalk of Austin City Hall

A display of giant jewelry made to invoke hunting mounts, ring displays, carnival hats and some wry commentary on the sexes. The displays are made of fake fur over an armature, the rings are made of powder coated and painted steel. Ten rings hang on five mounts.

Ring Trophies, side view
Ring Trophies, side view, 4 of 5
Ring Trophies
Ring Trophies, detail

 

Triangulated Spheres, Energy, painting

Energy

Energy Triptych, enamel on stainless steel, 57″x20″x2″ each, 2009

Triangulated Spheres, owdercoated and painted steel, installation dimensions vary, area shown here 60″x80″x5″, 2009

Detail view, largest sphere 5″ diameter

Created simultaneously with Energy, Triangulated Spheres came from a psychological influence—family dynamics, with a pattern generated by two primary “mates” and two offspring. The pattern regenerates along a mathematical principal, or not, as space and borders allow.

Triangulated Spheres, detail
Triangulated Spheres, detail
Triangulated Spheres Rules
Triangulated Spheres Rules

 

Triangulated Spheres
Triangulated Spheres
20 Ink Drawings

Ink Drawings, 2009

Ink on paper, 17″x14″ each, 2009

The initial movement in an artistic practice is that of the hand on paper. This mark-making studio practice recalls the attentiveness and inventiveness necessary for being present within one’s artistic practice. After time spent away from the studio, to begin again with this process reminds the hands of their skill and the shapes produced inspire other forms that come about in future work.

12 Ink Drawings
17″x14″ each page
8 Ink Drawings
17″x14″ each page
Wayfinding

Wayfinding: Installation view 2010

Wayfinding, installation view of 102′ long hall, with Morgann Berg viewing the piece.

Installed at the AT&T Courtyard Gallery as part of the Visual Art Center’s Exhibitions through The University of Texas at Austin.

Solo exhibition: May 13 – August 27, 2010

Click here to download PDF of Catalog

Chenoweth’s flowing three-dimensional wall installation is inspired by the four elements: earth, water, air and fire. She has created a unique topography utilizing the lengthy, traveling space of the gallery in a way that has not yet been explored.  Chenoweth’s methods and process for this piece include ink drawings on rice paper, torch-cut metal, dripped paint, and repeating spiraling cones in cast plaster.

Curated by Jade Walker, Visual Arts Center, Department of Art and Art History, The University of Texas at Austin.

 

The Last of the Cherry Blossom, painting and sculpture

The Last of the Cherry Blossom

Painting and wall sculpture, oil on panel, 46″x46″x2″, oil on six steel hemispheres, 4″, 5″, and 8″ diameter, 2009

Drawn from a quote from David Mitchell, “The last of the cherry blossom… when it’s perfect, it falls….So it’s only absolutely perfect when it’s falling through the air, this way and that, for the briefest time…”  A shadow created within the two-dimensional painting plane brings the path of the blossom into the viewer’s space, while the representational form in the background serves as a specific response.

Cherry Blossom bubble sculpture, side view detail
Cherry Blossom bubble sculpture, side view detail
The Last of the Cherry Blossom painting
The Last of the Cherry Blossom painting
Cherry Blossom Bubbles, detail
Cherry Blossom Bubbles, detail

 

 

Calendar Drips 2, painting

Calendar Drips

Showing two of six, enamel on steel, approximately 30″x24″x2″ each

“Calendar Drips” is a honorarium to a period in my life.
There is one steel row for months during a 6 year span.
It is a measure of work, communication and time.
The steel are drops from a waterjet cutting process, and came in long sections that looked like a giant saw blade.
They were cut into the number of pieces to represent one month per row, over 6 calendar years. They are like a graph of activity during that time.
The blue paint drips are a representation water which symbolizes acceptance and healing.
Calendar Drips
Calendar Drips
Installed at the Umlauf Museum