Dance of the Cosmos

Dance of the Cosmos

photo by Michelle Atkinson
90″ x 240″ x 240″
steel, concrete, pigment, acuator, solar panel and electrical accessories

Steps, drawing

Steps

acrylic and graphite on paper, 107″ x 96″

Steps is a study of the floorplan of the Temple of Venus.
It is a large mixed media on paper examining the geometry of the spacial relationships. I created giant compasses and unique drawing tools to hold pencils and brushes to create multiple marks with one movement.
The radius of the main circle was proportioned to be the distance of my son’s arm, and his hand prints mark points on the circle.

Charlemagne

acrylic and graphite on paper, 107″ x 96″

This large drawing on paper is a study of the floorplan of the basilica built by Charlemagne, the Aachen Cathedral in Germany.
It is a large mixed media on paper examining the geometry of the spacial relationships. It is drawn as if faceted, as the vaults of the ceilings in the space were built.
These drawings are first layered digitally, because many of the hand-drawn floorplans vary. Then I project the image to get a general proportion that is interesting to human scale, then I measure and draw all of the geometric shapes from center points.

The paper hangs from binder clips with wood strips to support paper at top and bottom.

License

acrylic, chalk and graphite on paper, 107″ x 112″

This large drawing also had an iteration as a wall sculpture and study, “Le Galluce.” This large drawing on paper is a study of the floorplan of the Temple of Minerva Medica in Rome in the Licenian Gardens.
It is a large, mixed media, drawing on paper examining the geometry of the spacial relationships. It is drawn expressively, allowing the movement of my arms to radius circles.

 

Corpus

paint on steel, 24″ x 60″ x 96″

This piece is a full size sculpture that was originally made as a smaller wall sculpture and study, “Santa Maria de Fiore.”
The name is from the basilica in Italy from which the geometry of the floorplan inspired this piece.
Corpus, however, hangs at 40″ off of the floor, suspended from the ceiling from rods and chains.
It is proportioned for a person to lay on the ground under the piece and see themselves reflected in it, as well as to walk around it at approximately chest height for an adult.
The cruciform shape of a basilica is taken from the human form, and with this piece is brought back to human scale.
Its surface is painted as skin on a body.

 

 

Montano painting

Montano

acrylic and graphite on paper, 107″ x 96″
Montano is a drawing from a floorplan only found in Giovanni Battista Montano’s sketchbooks. I can find no other visual reference for it.
Its looming figurative presence like a classical bust inspired me to draw it large. I very much imagined the viewpoints one would have walking into that building at any scale as I drew the shapes, columns and vaults of the plan.

St. Costanza painting

Costanza

acrylic, chalk and graphite on paper, 74″ x 109″