Revive and Reach

Revive and Reach

Reach (image left), oil on aluminum, 60″ diameter, 18″ h, 2012

Revive (image right), oil on aluminum, 30″h x 60″w x 60″l, 2012

Revive DetailRevive Detatil plus paper model

Line Quality

Line Quality

Oil, charcoal and graphite on plasma cut steel, set of 4, 62″x8″x8″ each

Four steel cylinders with surface drawings using a plasma cutter, pencil and brush, stand at human height, requiring the entirety of the body to move along the pipe, as if dancing. The pipes themselves are the 3-dimensional steel canvas for the surface drawing in pencil, chalk and oil glazes.

On the KLRU Video about Generous Art, you can watch me work on these pieces.

 

Gift

Gift

Oil and charcoal on plasma-cut steel, 84″ x 14″ x 2″

calligraphy two

Calligraphy One and Two

Calligraphy Two, oil and charcoal on plasma cut steel, 59″ x 19″ x 2″ each

Pushing the boundary between painting and sculpture, this one part of a two-part piece evolves gestural mark-making into steel sculptural form. The durable, outdoor material of the form is contrasted by the more fragile, subtle surface of the piece, detailed with oil, chalk and ink.

Calligraphy One
Calligraphy One

Paired with Calligraphy One:

Calligraphy one and two
Installed in collector’s home
Jennifer Chenoweth, Heaven and Hell at Austin City Hall

Hell and Heaven Together

Oil and charcoal on plasma-cut aluminum, 30″ x 60″ x 60″ each

Looking at process and totality, these two domes consider the concept of opposites as two parts of a whole. The shapes originated from one 4″x4″ calligraphic ink drawing that was made into a repeating hexagon. The shapes were cut from aluminum, and the positive shapes make “Heaven” and the negative shapes make “Hell”. Heaven is axial symmetry. Hell is non-axial symmetry. The artworks go together as a set.

Heaven sculpture installed Hell sculpture installedHell at Santa Fe Community College Hell at Santa Fe Community College

Andiamo wall view of installation

Andiamo, wall view

Andiamo, wall view of artworks

Andiamo: This body of work reengages my research of Roman architecture. I study mathematical proportion, path, axis, and patterns in plans and elevations of buildings. I am interested in how these spherical clusters relate to human scale, as diagrammed by Vitruvius. I want to understand how a sacred spaces are created architecturally and sculpturally.

These artworks are abstractions of real architectural buildings from the Roman Empire. They are models for large-scale sculpture. I am interested in the paint and texture as a response to traditional surface decoration of domes in architecture. By constructing these shaped surfaces, I am creating sacred space for my own painting and drawing practice.

Ring Trophies

Ring Trophies

Five Ring Trophies are mounted to the third floor catwalk of Austin City Hall

A display of giant jewelry made to invoke hunting mounts, ring displays, carnival hats and some wry commentary on the sexes. The displays are made of fake fur over an armature, the rings are made of powder coated and painted steel. Ten rings hang on five mounts.

Ring Trophies, side view
Ring Trophies, side view, 4 of 5
Ring Trophies
Ring Trophies, detail

 

Calendar Drips 2, painting

Calendar Drips

Showing two of six, enamel on steel, approximately 30″x24″x2″ each

“Calendar Drips” is a honorarium to a period in my life.
There is one steel row for months during a 6 year span.
It is a measure of work, communication and time.
The steel are drops from a waterjet cutting process, and came in long sections that looked like a giant saw blade.
They were cut into the number of pieces to represent one month per row, over 6 calendar years. They are like a graph of activity during that time.
The blue paint drips are a representation water which symbolizes acceptance and healing.
Calendar Drips
Calendar Drips
Installed at the Umlauf Museum

 

Line Drawing sculpture, side view

Line Drawing

Wood, plexiglass, graphite, steel, 108″x96″x168″, 1998

Line Arch Model
Model for understanding arch proportion

Curfed wood sculpture, creating a perspective illusion through elongated and splayed shapes; plexiglass forms a curving, expanded vaulted ceiling

Line Drawing sculpture, front view
Line Drawing sculpture, front view